How Would You Spend 24 Hours in Paris?

June 5, 2014 | By | COMMENTS

You all have been so helpful so far planning my European trip (I can’t believe we leave in two weeks!) and now I have a new challenge for you. My good friends Mark and Diana will be in Paris while I’m in London and I’ve decided to take that chummy old Chunnel to visit them for 24 hours before continuing on to meet Craig in Munich. This begs the question: WHAT TO DO IN PARIS FOR 24 HOURS? Or, more importantly, WHAT TO EAT IN PARIS FOR 24 HOURS? Don’t forget, I’ve been there once before, so this trip it would be nice to try some new things (though returning to Pierre Herme is definitely on my agenda). Also, looking for a dinner spot that’s super special but not insanely pricey (current thoughts: Restaurant Le Chateaubriand or Frenchie). Have at it, smart people! Merci beaucoup.

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Categories: Travel

  • Salim

    Hi,

    you can eat a Fish & Chips at The Sunken Chip https://www.facebook.com/TheSunkenChip. Probably the best in Paris (around 14€ for a complete menu).

    You can also try the Paris-New-York http://www.pny-hamburgers.fr/. The best burgers (and just burgers) in Paris (15€ with fries). It’s often crowded but if you go before 20:00 pm you’ll find some place.

    For more Nouvelle Cuisine, you can try Neva Cuisine https://plus.google.com/115559854040528352325/about?gl=fr&hl=fr (between 35 and 65€).

    And why not try this one : http://www.timeout.com/paris/en/restaurants/urfa-dueruem

    Happy trip.

    Salim.

  • Chris

    Frenchie is amazing, and Le Chateaubriand is a classic – you really cannot go wrong. But you may want to consider Spring as well for a delicious, but not over-the-top dinner. Daniel Rose is maybe the best young chef in Paris.

    Another place similar to Frenchie (complete with an accompanying wine bar that also serves great food if you cannot get a reservation) is Verjus – really small, cute place run by an American husband/wife team. Ate there (as well as Frenchie) a month ago, and had the most delicious Tonka Bean ice cream. I wanted to bring some Tonka beans back to the States, but apparently that’s illegal!

    For brunch/lunch, consider the crepes at Breizeh Cafe.

    Lastly, Laduree is so much better than Pierre Herme in my humble opinion!

  • http://theroserecord.blogspot.com/ Katie Rose

    Our favorite dinner in Paris was at Le Violon d’Ingres. Stunning meal, beautifuls ervice, and not yoru standard french bistro fare. . http://www.maisonconstant.com/violon-ingres/en/

  • Johan Smidt

    Travelling there with my son Jason, a chef par excellence, so wont go wanting for the best !!

  • Andi Montgomery

    I second the recommendation for Neva. It’s very affordable, with a great modern French prix fix menu. Bon Appetit included them in a 2012 article: http://www.bonappetit.com/restaurants-travel/article/tables-of-the-moment

    I *also* second the recommendation for Le Violon d’Ingres or, for a more casual meal, its sister restaurant Cafe Constant. They’re in the 7th, less than 5 min walking from the Eiffel Tower.

    I enjoyed Au Port Du Salut (in the 5th near the Pantheon) for classic rustic French food for a friend’s wedding reception dinner. (http://auportdusalut.com/)

    When I was in Paris on my own, I particularly liked exploring the food markets and cafes on the pedestrian avenues Rue Cler (in the 7th, near the Eiffel Tower) and Rue Montorgueil (in the 2nd, near the Pompidou Center). The restaurants on Rue Cler are particularly touristy, so I’d avoid those.

    As far as non-eating things to do, my favorite place is the Rodin Museum. It’s small – just a large-ish house and beautiful gardens filled with Rodin’s work (including The Thinker) and paintings by his famous artist friends. It’s peaceful (esp compared to the craziness of the Louvre) and easily enjoyed within an hour or so. It’s also in the 7th. I had a blast on my own at the Pompidou as well – lots of fun and crazy modern art. It takes a bit longer than the Rodin Museum, but if quirky, humorous art is your thing, it’s worth it.

  • Julia

    My favorite dinner in Paris last summer was at Le Petit Matieu, a wine bar in the 10th near the Canal St Martin. It had beautifully prepared food in a relaxed setting. There are lots of other nice places in that area, including Du Pain et des Idees for unusual and very good break, Verre Vole – another wine bar that is well liked that I didn’t make it to, and it is refreshingly un-touristed.
    My favorite croissant (and I tried many) was at 134 RDT.

  • Liz

    I’ll also be in Paris starting July 3–I’ve been doing a lot of research. It’s my first trip back in a decade. I was considering Philou for a nicer meal. Anyone have thoughts on it? Frenchie was on my radar as well, and I was also trying to decide between Bistro Paul Bert and Le 6 Paul Bert which I know are quite different! I think Philou will cover Bistro Paul Bert’s territory well, so if I can perhaps Le 6… I’ll be staying in the Belleville neighborhood so have also figured out a few things in the area.

  • Heather

    FL is a fantastic spot for dinner near the Eiffel Tower. I’ve been there a couple of times, and it’s always insanely delicious.

  • idiotmittens

    Septime or it’s nearby Cave. Bones, either for dinner or for snacks at the bar (the porc au last sandwiches are amaze). If you have money to burn, Arpege (the lunch menu isn’t actually that expensive for the quality but dinner is slap the maître d expensive.

  • clbtx

    You might have a hard time getting a reservation at Frenchie or Chateaubriand at this point, unless you have a local connection, which I think you might have. :-) The Frenchie wine bar doesn’t require reservations and I think I might like it more than the restaurant itself. Note that they are only open Mon-Fri.

    Verjus is also extremely good and you might be able to get a spot there a little easier. I’ve been there several times (to both the restaurant and wine bar) and it just gets better and better. Again, only open Mon-Fri.

    Bones is very good, but a little less polished than Verjus and Frenchie. The menu is a bit more adventurous, I think.

    Mary Celeste is great for small plates and cocktails, in the Marais.

    There are too many choices! But, this site has never steered me wrong: http://parisbymouth.com/

  • Anonymous

    I loved “Ze Kitchen Galerie” in the 6eme Arrondissment when I was there a few years ago. Beautiful, inspiring, delicious. Must try: http://www.zekitchengalerie.fr/

  • Mike

    Ok. Two things. One is possibly cliché, the other not so much. First, the cliché. Go to Pied de cochon and have the steak tartare. Then go to the Musée de Camando. Gorgeous house built by a Jewish family around 1900 in the style of the 18th century. Fabulous interior. Heartbreaking story of the family courtesy of World One and the the Holocaust. Probably the most underrated museum in Paris.

  • BobYes

    Just ask Daveed for his latest suggestions and eat your head off

  • sweetfrancaise

    If you want something off the beaten path, try le Bistrot du Peintre in the 11eme. It’s a stunning art nouveau restaurant full of locals lingering over meals for hours in deep conversations, good food (the duck is divine! just don’t get the Andouillette) and friendly waiters who speak English.
    http://www.bistrotdupeintre.com/

  • Sara

    La Regalade Saint-Honore

  • Jered

    [Apologies if this is a dupe; the Diqus is acting weird --J]

    It’s been a few years, but Taillevent’s prix fixe lunch (or dinner, I’m sure) near L’arch de Triomphe was amazing! I highly recommend them: http://www.taillevent.com/

    Also, don’t bother with La Tour d’Argent, unless you want ancient food, ancient staff, sterling silver duck presses, but fabulous views.

    If you’re near République, I also strongly recommend Chez Imogène; we stumbled upon them when wandering near our hotel and were able to get a table. Tiny, inexpensive and fantastic. We went with the three course set menu, with cider which I learned is the traditional pairing for crepes. My croque monsieur crepe entree was delicious and more than I could eat. For dessert my husband had a Grand Marnier crepe flambée… they poured on a full measured cup of liqueur on to start, and left the bottle should we feel we needed more.

  • Jered

    Oh, also if you stop by the Experimental Cocktail Club (one of the few interesting cocktail bars in Paris), ask the bartender for the name of the place down the street with the excellent magret tartare and charcuterie.

  • http://www.thisnewview.com andrea

    Be sure to go to L’eclair de Genie, and Blu Sucre for THE BEST croissants. I have about three hundred suggestions, but start with those and you’ll be doing pretty swell.

  • Anonymous

    Hey Adam, You might like Le Servan for lunch–good value, good atmosphere, good food: http://nymag.com/thecut/2014/05/7-new-paris-restaurants-to-know.html And give a shout if you have time for a coffee or a glass of wine. Cheers, Alec

  • Isabel

    I went Paris in January and for the special restaurant I can’t
    praise Le 6 Paul Bert more (David Lebovitz put me on to them of course). It is
    exceptional, the food is incredible, really interesting and constantly changing,
    it was the best meal I had in Paris/ever. You need to book and it is closed
    Saturday night and Sunday!

    Breizh Cáfe for the crepes (wow, we went twice in two days!)
    Café Constant for classic and beautiful French fair plus location is right by
    the Eiffel tower (cant book).

    Doesn’t look like much from the outside but if you go to one
    chocolate shop/sweet shop, make it l’Etoile d’Or. It is run by a brilliant lady
    called Denise Acabo who has pigtails and is pretty much the nicest Parisian you
    will meet. She gave me a chocolate which she said Meryl Streep had an orgasm
    over (well my French is poor but she mimed it! And it was amazing!). She stocks
    all the best chocolatiers stuff so it’s a good one stop. Get anything by
    Bernachon and caramels by Henri Le Roux (and his salted caramel spread is
    insane). Closed on Sundays. Other great places are John-Charles Rochoux (chocolatier)
    and of course Jacques Genin. Try Blé Sucré version of Kouign-amann. G Detou is a huge cook shop stuffed full of amazing
    ingredients for cooking /baking and gifts.

    Food aside, The Rodin Museum is my favourite, it is small
    and the house is so beautiful. All else fails hop on their city bikes and just
    cycle around the city.

  • http://blissnbalance.com/ Jessica

    I was in Paris last month and wasn’t able to get into Frenchie…I just didn’t plan ahead. Frenchie’s Wine Bar is across the street and is fantastic. They don’t accept any reservations but if you get there early and put your name on the list, you’ll be golden.

  • Ginny Murrell

    I agree about Laduree. Most sublime strawberry/rhubarb tart! All the food in Paris was delicious.

  • http://wp.me/p/milenapetrofig Milena Petrovic

    I would be spending my time with the future aces in Longines’ tennis tournament in the Champ de Mars..

  • Jasper Taylor

    Hi Adam, I was just in paris for a couple of months. I really recommend Septime — it felt really parisian circa right now. The food is innovative and great. And the price is right. Of the Springs, Frenchies, etc — it was my favorite. Frenchie is ok, but overpriced, and you’re better off eating at the no reservations Frenchie Wine Bar across the street — more choices and food is pretty much at the same level. I also found Spring slightly underwhelming — It’s really overpriced for what it is, though I enjoyed it ok. Again, like Frenchie, you have no choices — it’s a preselected three course meal. You’d do better at EMP in New York. Verjus is cute, but again, I feel like we’ve got this in the states — it’s very brooklyn. Same with Bones, which is pretty good and kind of the hot place in Paree at the moment. I’ve heard super mixed about Chateaubriand, b/c I think the chef is really uneven. You should also check out the Comptoir du Relais and the next door L’Avant Comptoir for classic bistro stuff — it’s hit and miss, but more hits than misses and the bone marrow and foie are both excellent. For tea/dessert I recommend Jacques Genin — he also makes the best caramels in the world. You should go to le merveilaux de fred and try one of these amazing concoctions. Drinks at Mary Celeste is really fun and the cocktails are amazing. Have a great trip

  • Tess

    Les Papillons in the Rue Moufftard. Great simple French food with a short menu that varies daily depending on what is good and available at the market. I found out about this gem thanks to Anthony Bourdain (No Reservations) and I figure that if he and Joel Robuchon were happy to eat there, then that’s where I wanted to have lunch too! :)

  • Stephanie

    Get invited ti David Lebovitz’s place and have a fun evening.. That’s what I would try to do if I had a slim chance at succeeding…

  • Stephanie

    Get invited ti David Lebovitz’s place and have a fun evening.. That’s what I would try to do if I had a slim chance at succeeding…

  • cybercita

    I haven’t been to Paris since about 2004 so I can’t really do any restaurant recommendations, but I thought I would tell you the things I ALWAYS do when I am there: go to Place Dauphine on Isle de la Cite behind the Palais de Justice and have a drink at Le Bar du Caveau while watching the petanque players; spend an hour at la Ste. Chapelle; visit St Sulpice, have coffee at the cafe on the tip of Ile St. Louis with the view of Notre Dame’s spectacular flying buttresses.

  • cybercita

    I haven’t been to Paris since about 2004 so I can’t really do any restaurant recommendations, but I thought I would tell you the things I ALWAYS do when I am there: go to Place Dauphine on Isle de la Cite behind the Palais de Justice and have a drink at Le Bar du Caveau while watching the petanque players; spend an hour at la Ste. Chapelle; visit St Sulpice, have coffee at the cafe on the tip of Ile St. Louis with the view of Notre Dame’s spectacular flying buttresses.

  • cybercita

    I haven’t been to Paris since about 2004 so I can’t really do any restaurant recommendations, but I thought I would tell you the things I ALWAYS do when I am there: go to Place Dauphine on Isle de la Cite behind the Palais de Justice and have a drink at Le Bar du Caveau while watching the petanque players; spend an hour at la Ste. Chapelle; visit St Sulpice, have coffee at the cafe on the tip of Ile St. Louis with the view of Notre Dame’s spectacular flying buttresses.

  • cybercita

    I haven’t been to Paris since about 2004 so I can’t really do any restaurant recommendations, but I thought I would tell you the things I ALWAYS do when I am there: go to Place Dauphine on Isle de la Cite behind the Palais de Justice and have a drink at Le Bar du Caveau while watching the petanque players; spend an hour at la Ste. Chapelle; visit St Sulpice, have coffee at the cafe on the tip of Ile St. Louis with the view of Notre Dame’s spectacular flying buttresses.

  • cybercita

    I haven’t been to Paris since about 2004 so I can’t really do any restaurant recommendations, but I thought I would tell you the things I ALWAYS do when I am there: go to Place Dauphine on Isle de la Cite behind the Palais de Justice and have a drink at Le Bar du Caveau while watching the petanque players; spend an hour at la Ste. Chapelle; visit St Sulpice, have coffee at the cafe on the tip of Ile St. Louis with the view of Notre Dame’s spectacular flying buttresses.

  • cybercita

    I haven’t been to Paris since about 2004 so I can’t really do any restaurant recommendations, but I thought I would tell you the things I ALWAYS do when I am there: go to Place Dauphine on Isle de la Cite behind the Palais de Justice and have a drink at Le Bar du Caveau while watching the petanque players; spend an hour at la Ste. Chapelle; visit St Sulpice, have coffee at the cafe on the tip of Ile St. Louis with the view of Notre Dame’s spectacular flying buttresses.

  • Jeff D

    Even though my carte de crédit would suffer badly, I’d go to Charvet and be measured up for three or four bespoke shirts. For -la nourriture- I’d take the advice of your friend David.

    Charvet
    28, place Vendôme (75001)
    Téléphone: +33142603070

  • TC

    Restaurant Abri
    Spring
    Bistro Paul Bert
    Cafe Constant

    Jacques Genin

  • Ryan

    BistroY… Les Papilles. Some of the best food for the money I’ve had in Paris. The food is excellent, tons of wine to choose from. Also a good place to pop in and check out the cote epicerie.

    http://www.lespapillesparis.fr/

  • NA

    Le Petit Fer à Cheval, an absolutely wonderful restaurant in the Marais. It’s right across from a bookstore slash wine bar called La Belle Hortense.

  • NA

    Le Petit Fer à Cheval, an absolutely wonderful restaurant in the Marais. It’s right across from a bookstore slash wine bar called La Belle Hortense.

  • NA

    Le Petit Fer à Cheval, an absolutely wonderful restaurant in the Marais. It’s right across from a bookstore slash wine bar called La Belle Hortense.

  • NA

    Le Petit Fer à Cheval, an absolutely wonderful restaurant in the Marais. It’s right across from a bookstore slash wine bar called La Belle Hortense.

  • Meghanssj

    If I only had 24 hours in Paris, . I would go to the Musee D’Orsay to see their amazing collection of paintings, Cezanne, Monet, Manet, Millet, Van Gogh, Munsch, Pissaro, Whistler, Gaugin, Seurat and Delacroix, to name some of the most recognizable and lovely which you can see in just a few hours. I’d also visit the Cimetiere du Pere-Lachaise which is a cemetery, but it is beautiful, and you can pay tribute to Edith Piaf, Jim Morrison and so many other notable people who rest in Paris (RIP). Then, I’d just wander by the Seine and up Champs Elysee. I don’t know where to eat. When I was there I was a student, so it was always a baguette, fruit, cheese and wine by the Seine. That is nice, but you’ve got a ton of other great ideas here. Since you know Mr. Libovitz, I’d be vying for a meal at his place!

  • Meghanssj

    If I only had 24 hours in Paris, . I would go to the Musee D’Orsay to see their amazing collection of paintings, Cezanne, Monet, Manet, Millet, Van Gogh, Munsch, Pissaro, Whistler, Gaugin, Seurat and Delacroix, to name some of the most recognizable and lovely which you can see in just a few hours. I’d also visit the Cimetiere du Pere-Lachaise which is a cemetery, but it is beautiful, and you can pay tribute to Edith Piaf, Jim Morrison and so many other notable people who rest in Paris (RIP). Then, I’d just wander by the Seine and up Champs Elysee. I don’t know where to eat. When I was there I was a student, so it was always a baguette, fruit, cheese and wine by the Seine. That is nice, but you’ve got a ton of other great ideas here. Since you know Mr. Libovitz, I’d be vying for a meal at his place!

  • Meghanssj

    If I only had 24 hours in Paris, . I would go to the Musee D’Orsay to see their amazing collection of paintings, Cezanne, Monet, Manet, Millet, Van Gogh, Munsch, Pissaro, Whistler, Gaugin, Seurat and Delacroix, to name some of the most recognizable and lovely which you can see in just a few hours. I’d also visit the Cimetiere du Pere-Lachaise which is a cemetery, but it is beautiful, and you can pay tribute to Edith Piaf, Jim Morrison and so many other notable people who rest in Paris (RIP). Then, I’d just wander by the Seine and up Champs Elysee. I don’t know where to eat. When I was there I was a student, so it was always a baguette, fruit, cheese and wine by the Seine. That is nice, but you’ve got a ton of other great ideas here. Since you know Mr. Libovitz, I’d be vying for a meal at his place!

  • Meghanssj

    If I only had 24 hours in Paris, . I would go to the Musee D’Orsay to see their amazing collection of paintings, Cezanne, Monet, Manet, Millet, Van Gogh, Munsch, Pissaro, Whistler, Gaugin, Seurat and Delacroix, to name some of the most recognizable and lovely which you can see in just a few hours. I’d also visit the Cimetiere du Pere-Lachaise which is a cemetery, but it is beautiful, and you can pay tribute to Edith Piaf, Jim Morrison and so many other notable people who rest in Paris (RIP). Then, I’d just wander by the Seine and up Champs Elysee. I don’t know where to eat. When I was there I was a student, so it was always a baguette, fruit, cheese and wine by the Seine. That is nice, but you’ve got a ton of other great ideas here. Since you know Mr. Libovitz, I’d be vying for a meal at his place!

  • Laura Spiekerman

    WALK AND EAT

    Best croissant: Pierre Herme. There are a few of them in Paris. I went to the one in the 6th (on the left bank, 72 Rue Bonaparte), and then walked two blocks to Saint Sulpice (a big beautiful church) and sat outside by the fountain to eat it. The bakery has a lot of other really beautiful pastries, macarons, etc.

    Best macaron: Laduree (21 Rue Bonaparte). There are also a few of these, I went to the one close to the above-mentioned Pierre Herme (just walk north up Rue Bonaparte to the other side of Blvd Saint Germain). This also is just a beautiful little bakery, perfect to get stuff there or take little boxes of macarons home as gifts.

    Best bread: Not baguette (I think you can find great baguette everywhere — there are always contests too so you just google it to find the best in your neighborhood). Pain Poilane is super famous. You can go there (8 Rue du Cherche Midi) and is close to the above places but you can also find restaurants all over Paris that will serve things on “pain Poilane” on the menu, which means they use their bread. You’ll find a ton of brasseries that do it. So if you don’t want to go to the bakery just order that (I had a great meal of sardines on pain poilane with olives).

    Classic brasserie: La Coupole. Classic, famous brasserie that’s really pretty and you can make reservations online at that link. Same very famous people used to eat here (Picasso, Matisse, Sartre, etc.).

    Overall foodwise, most neighborhood brasseries serve solid food — I’d stick with steak frites, salads, etc. Things Parisians know how to do! And if you start with just a few words in French they’ll be a lot nicer to you (“Comment ca va?”)

    Neighborhoods to walk around.
    Marais: I love the Marais. It’s on the right bank, on the east side very close to the river. It is in the 4th arrondissement. It’s the old Jewish neighborhood though you can’t see much of that anymore. It has cobblestones and is pretty, with great shopping.
    Food: If you’re there for lunch go to L’As du Fallafel for the best falafel. You can sit down and eat inside or take it to go and eat on the street. Rue Rambuteau is one of the main streets in this neighborhood, with lots of cute little side streets. I really like Les Mauvais Garcons — they have a fantastic steak that you can order lots of different ways. Casual and elegant and romantic inside. Also only 24 Euros, pretty cheap for Paris.
    Activities: For activities in this area, I really recommend Les Halles or Centre Pompidou. Les Halles is the historic food market, it was torn down but the area is now a food area with lots of cooking stores, etc. and they’re building a big park. Centre Pompidou is my favorite museum in Paris — it’s really modern/contemporary (both the museum itself and the art inside) and is more fun than the other art museums in Paris.
    5th & 6th / Quarter Latin / Saint Germain: I think this is where I’d want to live. It’s on the left bank, just near the river. It used to be more bohemian, etc. but now is just as fancy as the rest of Paris. Take a stroll down Boulevard Saint Germain and get a drink at Cafe les Deux Magots or Cafe de Flore (they’re one block from each other), both are historic and very cute. They’re where Hemingway, JP Sartre, Simone de Beauvoire, and Picasso all used to drink and eat. Just good little people watching. You can walk from this street to both Pierre Herme and Laduree. The area has great shopping. Also Luxembourg Gardens are very pretty to sit in — grab a snack/bottle of wine and sit and people watch. Parisian parks are super well kept and you don’t really sit on the grass, you find a park bench and drink/eat.
    Montmartre: It might be a little far from where you’re staying since it’s in the northern part of Paris but you also might head there to see Sacre Coeur. If you do, go to Montmartre a bit early or after to walk around. As usual, good shopping, and just a really pretty area. It’s where Amelie took place.
    Rue Saint Honore: This is probably fairly close to your hotel (east of Champs Elysee). It’s a fun fancy shopping area — more for window shopping. Collette (213 Rue Saint Honore) is the best store to do that in. I also loved Astier de Villatte (173 Rue Saint Honore) for beautiful dishes.
    Tuilerie Gardens: Close to Rue Saint Honore. Beautiful gardens that you can spend an hour or two walking around in, or get a croque madame or something. Or a hot drink.

  • Charlotte

    Ladurée is lovely for macaroons but don’t go near their religieuse… dry. Beurk! I live in Paris, my favourite bistro spot is just by the Jardin de Luxembourg at “Comme a savonnières” https://plus.google.com/100297885468281167650/about?gl=fr&hl=fr

  • http://dianeabroad.com/ Diane, A Broad

    I lived in Paris for 2012 and much of 2013 and have been back a couple times since. Some favorites:

    Verjus and Frenchie Wine Bar are tied for favorite dinner spots. The restaurant at Verjus is prix-fixe, reservations-only, €65-75/person without wine. Incredible produce, intelligently cooked. Braden and Laura are the best and they cultivate a beautiful sense of community in their restaurant. Go downstairs to the wine bar for after-dinner drinks.

    I was so obsessed with the food at Frenchie that I went to the restaurant or the wine bar once or twice a week while I was there. The restaurant is probably booked up at this point, but I like the wine bar better anyway. Since you’ll be there during tourist season, line up 30-45 minutes before opening and you should get in. Try to get a seat at one of the tables that overlooks the kitchen — the cooks there have a tendency to look as delicious as the food. Oh, and Frenchie To Go is open all day, so you can do breakfast or lunch there, too.

    I’ve got to say I wasn’t super impressed by Le Chateaubriand. They were using a lot of interesting techniques, but the food itself was underwhelming. If you need to get in without reservations, go hang out in the tiny wine bar across the street around 8:30 until you see people start lining up for the 9pm seating, then line up behind them immediately.

    James Henry over at Bones is probably doing the most exciting cooking in Paris right now, and at €40-50 for the prix-fixe, it’s one of the best deals in town. Tell them you like the bread and sometimes they send you home with a loaf.

    Probably too much information. If I were in Paris for 24 hours, I would: wake up early and take a walk on the Ile Saint-Louis. Metro over to Soul Kitchen in Montmartre for weekday brunch and hang about Sacre-Coeur and the butte for a bit. Metro down to Frenchie to Go for lunch or a snack, walk around the Rue Montorgueil area and stroll over to the 1st, maybe dip in/around the Louvre/Tuileries if I’ve got time before a 7pm-ish dinner at Frenchie. I’d ask to take the cheese and dessert courses down in the wine bar so I could hang out with Laura for a bit. Then I’d go over to Le Mary Celeste (Marais) or Red House (ditto) or Glass (South Pigalle) for cocktails (and dancing if Glass).