A Go-To Recipe for A Go-Go Boy: Pumpkin Bread

May 4, 2004 | By | COMMENTS

If there were a bar graph of things I cook, it might look like Manute Bull in Munchkintown. The Manute Bull, of course, would be Pumpkin Bread. I always make Pumpkin Bread. It’s my go-to recipe. Here’s why…

To make pumpkin bread all you need is a can of pumpkin and that’s it. I mean, that’s not it—but it’s the only rare ingredient. Otherwise you have the flour, you have the sugar, you have the vegetable oil; maybe you have the ground cloves, cinnamon, and nutmeg; and hopefully you have a bread pan and a sifter. But if you cook at all, you have all those other ingredients. So buy some cans of pumpkin and go make pumpkin bread.

It’s so easy. [I use this recipe from Epicurious.]

First you butter and flour the pan.

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Then combine the vegetable oil and sugar:

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Next add the eggs and hold up a can of pumpkin.

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Actually, I should address an egg issue here. I halved the recipe to make only one loaf and in the process had to turn 3 eggs into 1.5 eggs. How did I do this? I plopped the first egg into the mix and then cracked the second egg into a bowl, which I scrambled a bit and then poured out half. Good thinking?

Here’s the pumpkin out of the can:

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Now we bring in the spicy triplets:

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I love these spices. They’re quite autumnal, I’ll admit, but they taste good any time of year.

Sift them, the flour and baking soda into a separate bowl:

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Mix the flour into the other stuff in two additions:

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Pour into the bread pan:

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And bake for 70 mintues at 350 degrees.

This might be a good time to admit my tendency to underbake things. It comes from my original training as a brownie chef: then it was always ok to underbake; in fact, it was preferable.

But I’m starting to understand the merits of fully baking whatever you’re baking. Something wonderful happens texturally when something is fully baked and Pumpkin Bread is a good example. The top gets crustier and sugarier and–well–you’ll know it when you taste it.

Check it out:

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Cut myself a slice? Don’t mind if I do!

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Delicious!

It took longer to write this post than it did to make the pumpkin bread. And now I have a whole loaf just waiting to be devoured. Which is more than I can say for you. Hmph!

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  • Veronica

    Oh Adam. That looks good. I had a Dawn of the Dead type dream last night (zombie takeover) and at one point you and Lauren were roller skating together in my dream. It was totally surreal. BUT it was evidence that the original DoftheD was BETTER than there-make. That had nothing to do with pumpkin. But it’s true. P.S.- I bet dried cranberries would be a good addition to that recipie! P.P.S.- Are you bringing Lolita to New York?

  • Anne

    Veronica is right! Dried cranberries are a superb addition to pumpkin loaf. They taste great paired with pecans, too. And while you’re experimenting with different add-ins, don’t forget chocolate chips.

  • Veronica

    Oh, right on Anne! Even better thanjust cranberries would be cranberries and walnuts or cranberries and pecans. That’d add the “little moisty bits” texture AND the “crunchy little nutters” texture to the bread. Mmm…

  • http://www.livejournal.com/~street_light faith

    haha! Terry the raw food chef is an immensely amusing video! Having recently been exposed to the world of raw food cooking, I found this video very humorous and creative. Next time I want liver, I will have to turn to strawberries! P.S. What are your thoughts concerning raw food cooking/its health benefits?

  • Christianne

    This is the strangest thing I have ever seen, there’s no list of measured ingredients, One can of pumpkin with ? flour, and other ingredients leaves me

    siting here going ?????