A Cobbler Recipe for Cobbler People: Cherry and Apricot Cobbler

In this world there are pie people, tart people, and cobbler people.

Pie people, bless their souls, say things like “bless their souls.” They wear aprons and buy toilet paper at Sam’s club.

Tart people are a little edgier, but not much. Their hair is cropped and they wear wire-rimmed glasses. They don’t favor Yanni, but they don’t dislike him either. In Sex and the City terms, tart people are Miranda.

And then there are cobbler people. We’re the rustics, the hands-dirty type. We like finger painting and eating glue. We’re impatient. We don’t care what it looks like as long as it tastes good. We are cobbler people.

What I like about cobbler is that it is so easy. You make the fruit, you make the topping, and you’re done. It’s a great way, also, to try different fruits and to celebrate the season. Except cobbler people don’t say things like “celebrate the season.” Pie people say that.

A few days ago I spotted apricots and cherries at Whole Foods. Remember how I told you to keep your eyes out for what’s in season? This was one of those times. So tonight I scrambled over there, loaded up on ingredients, and came storming back ready to make my cobbler.

Here are my apricots:

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Here are my cherries:

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After washing the apricots and cherries, I began the pitting process. Pitting cherries is the pits. I tried various techniques, but ultimately relied on my fingers. It took a while. Here are the results:

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And here are the pits:

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And the Pips:

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Now you halve and pit the apricots. This wasn’t too hard, I used a paring knife:

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The recipe I used (from Epicurious) has you toss the fruit with sugar, cornstarch and (rather unconventionally) almond extract. After which I poured it into the baking dish:

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It baked for 35 minutes at 400 degrees. It came out smelling great:

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Meanwhile, I made the topping. This was easy too. First I whisked together the flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda and salt:

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Then I cut up a stick of cold butter into squares. Notice how ingenious (and immodest) I am. I halved the butter lengthwise, flipped it over, halved it again (thus quartering it). Then I sliced down horizontally to get cubes:

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Work the butter into the flour with your fingers until it resembles “coarse meal.” I never get this instruction because I am none too familiar with coarse meal. I imagine, though, that coarse meal looks like this:

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Sam Neil, on the other hand, looks like this:

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Here’s where our recipe gets sloppy. You pour in 3/4 cup of buttermilk and 3/4 cup of whipping cream:

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Everything turns quite gloppy:

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The cobblers I usually make have crumby toppings; this one would turn out biscuity. It made the actual toppping process (glopping the batter on to the fruit) a bit more difficult. “Drop dough by rounded tablespoonfulls” says the recipe. I managed ok, and it looked like this:

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Then I baked for 40 minutes at 375 and it came out looking like this:

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Pretty huh?

Now from the side:

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Served us up a bowl:

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And it was quite delicious. I was worried for a bit. I thought the cherries wouldn’t be cherryey enough. That the apricots wouldn’t be tart enough. That the topping wouldn’t be crumby enough. But nothing to worry about: everything tasted bright and terrific. This is a good early summer recipe. That is if you’re a cobbler person. And who wouldn’t want to be a cobbler person? We’re the best.

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8 comments

  1. I would argue that both pie and cobbler people buy their toilet paper at Sam’s except pie people buy a name brand and cobbler people the Sam’s Club brand (I’m assuming they have one). So why are cobbler people superior again? And why can’t I find apricots like that here in Asheville? Enjoyed a late night movie fest of your sidebar films last night~only cobbler could have made the evening better….

  2. Actually almond extract is very common when cooking with cherries. Sets the flavor off better than vanilla. Hoever vanilla ice cream is highly recommended with cobblers of all kinds.

  3. Yes, I would argue that the crisp/crumble person is a cobbler person with a little more Birkenstock/local honey/Farmer’s market thrown in. And being a crisp person, I say that lovingly.

  4. Being a cobbler person, I naturally gravitated to this website. It is HILARIOUS! Never knew baking could be interspersed with so much humor ~ and great photos! I am very disappointed, however, that the picture of Sam Neill didn’t come through. I WILL be back to this site! Thanks for the chuckles and the great recipe!